We Found the Stupidest Critical Race Theory Argument Yet, and It Involves Freud

The panic reaches psychoanalytical new heights.

The panic over critical race theory—the shorthand boogeyman conservatives have weaponized to vilify schools that examine the role of institutional racism in the United States—has seen its fair share of absurdity in recent months, particularly as Republican lawmakers across the country push bills effectively banning discussions of race in classrooms.

But after Gen. Mark Milley, the chairman of the joints chiefs of staff, defended the study of critical race theory before Congress this week, a new and especially wild argument against CRT appears to have emerged. Speaking on Newsmax, contributor Dick Morris started with the usual GOP talking points falsely accusing CRT of attempting to teach children that all white people are racist. But then Morris offered what he, rather mildly, described as a “unique thought” on the debate.

“What does this do to the children?” he asked. “What does this do to a kid? A quarter of all Black marriages are intermarriage, racially. So what does that do to a Black boy whose mother is Black and his father is white? What does he think? ‘My father exploited my mother and that’s how he got successful?’ Does this reinforce the Oedipal notion that all kids have wanting to kill their father and marry their mother?”

The suggestion that by studying the role of racism in today’s society, a child could develop sexual desires for the opposite-sex parent, then fuel thoughts of murder against the other parent is, as Morris put it, unique. Still, it would be far from surprising if Morris’ psychoanalytical approach takes hold among conservatives always looking to advance this nonexistent culture war. 

In any event, if you’re looking for a palate cleanser after that Morris absurdity, I recommend you watch, if you haven’t already, what Milley had to say about CRT. Be sure to catch Matt Gaetz’s response in there too.

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