Aging Senators’ Zoom With Zelenskyy Went About as Well as You’d Expect

Some shared screen shots that could have compromised Zelenskyy’s safety.

Viewers watch the speech of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy at an event in the Czech Republic on March 4, 2022.Photo/Miroslav Chaloupka (CTK via AP Images)

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Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy met with members of the US Congress Saturday morning to plead for more military help—he asked for either a no-fly zone over his country to protect it from Russian air attacks, or shipments of planes. While Congressional leadership praised the meeting, it seems to have had all of the hiccups you might expect from a Zoom call involving dozens of aging, tech-inept, publicity-hungry American politicians. 

The event was, of course, an opportunity for members of Congress to brag about their involvement in the crisis: Members of both parties posted pictures of themselves participating in the call and even sending side-messages to Zelenskyy, who appeared unshaven and wearing an army green t-shirt as he spoke about the need for military assistance. 

But GOP senators Marco Rubio, of Florida, and Steve Daines, of Montana, were blasted by some of their colleagues for doing their bragging in a real-time—something that members of Congress were specifically asked not to do to ensure Zelenskyy’s safety.

In a less serious Zoom call infraction, Zelenskyy himself had to scold Florida Republican Rick Scott for his own bad etiquette.

 

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