Consumer Protection Bureau Ends Investigation of Company that Donated to Leader’s Campaigns

Mick Mulvaney, a longtime industry ally, is reshaping how payday lenders are regulated.

Mick MulvaneyCheriss May/Zuma

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After President Trump appointed Mick Mulvaney to run the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in November, consumer advocates expressed concern that the former South Carolina congressman had a glaring conflict of interest: while the CFPB is tasked with regulating payday lenders—companies which target low-income borrowers for high-interest loans—Mulvaney has long been an ally of the industry. Between 2011 and 2017, he received nearly $60,000 in campaign donations from payday lenders, and sponsored several bills to loosen their supervision.

On Monday, Mulvaney’s agency quietly closed a four-year investigation into World Acceptance Corporation, a payday lender that is among Mulvaney’s past campaign donors, according to the International Business Times. The move offers the latest indication that Mulvaney is reshaping the agency’s approach to regulating such lenders; last week, the CFPB announced that it would “reconsider” an Obama-era rule that sought to curb predatory practices by the industry, and dropped an April 2017 lawsuit it had filed against four payday lenders in Kansas. (The CFPB did not reply to a request for comment.)

World Acceptance Corporation announced the investigation’s close in a Monday press release that claimed it had received a letter from the CFPB saying that the investigation was complete and that the agency had decided against enforcement action. The company’s PAC also gave at least $4,500 in donations to Mulvaney’s congressional campaigns between 2013 and 2016.

“It definitely seems that Mulvaney is doing what he can to make life easier for payday lenders, which is completely contrary to what almost everybody in America thinks should happen,” said Diane Standaert, executive vice president for the Center for Responsible Lending.

In recent days, Mulvaney has signaled a broader overhaul of the CFPB. Last week he sent a letter to the Federal Reserve requesting no funding for the agency over the next three months, saying it would instead spend down emergency reserves amassed by Obama’s CFPB director, Richard Cordray. On Tuesday, Mulvaney also sent a memo to the CFPB staff outlining a new vision for the agency. In drawing a contrast with his predecessor, Mulvaney wrote that the agency would no longer “push the envelope” to achieve its mission, he wrote.

“We don’t just work for the government, we work for the people,” he wrote. “And that means everyone: those who use credit cards, and those who provide those cards; those who take loans, and those who make them; those who buy cars, and those who sell them. All of those people are part of what makes this country great, and all of them deserve to be treated fairly by their government. There is a reason that Lady Justice wears a blindfold and carries a balance, along with her sword.”

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SIX TRUTHS

Reclaiming power from those who abuse it often starts with telling the truth. And in "This Is How Authoritarians Get Defeated," MoJo's Monika Bauerlein unpacks six truths to remember during the homestretch of an election where democracy, truth, and decency are on the line.

Truth #1: The chaos is the point.

Truth #2: Team Reality is bigger than it seems.

Truth #3: Facebook owns this.

Truth #4: When we go to work, we're in the fight.

Truth #5: It's about minority rule.

Truth #6: The only thing that can save us is…us.

Please take a moment to see how all these truths add up, because what happens in the weeks and months ahead will reverberate for at least a generation and we better be prepared.

And if you think journalism like Mother Jones'—that calls it like it is, that will never acquiesce to power, that looks where others don't—can help guide us through this historic, high-stakes moment, and you're able to right now, please help us reach our $350,000 goal by October 31 with a donation today. It's all hands on deck for democracy.

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