Country-Rocker Corb Lund Shows Off His Wit and High-Lonesome Voice


Corb Lund
Things That Can’t Be Undone
New West

With his flexible, high-lonesome voice and witty songs, Corb Lund makes records that have real staying power. On Things That Can’t Be Undone, his first studio outing in three years, the Canadian country-rocker and his nimble supporting trio, the Hurtin’ Albertans, dispatch sizzling boogie rave-ups and heart-tugging ballads equally well, uncorking a batch of snappy tunes bigger names would be smart to cover. Among the high points: “Weight of the Gun,” a loping tale of regret in the spirit of vintage Johnny Cash, “Washed-Up Rock Star Factory Blues,” a hilarious unofficial sequel to Johnny Paycheck’s “Take This Job and Shove It,” and the haunting war story “Sadr City.” Then again, there’s not a dull or false note to be found on this remarkable and rewarding album.

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