America Didn’t Get to See John Oliver’s Latest Work of Comic Genius. Here It Is.


Since last year’s World Cup in Brazil, comedian John Oliver has used his Last Week Tonight perch to sound off about the ongoing allegations of corruption and human rights abuses involving FIFA, soccer’s governing body. On Tuesday night, he brought that criticism to a new venue: Trinidadian television.

His target? Former FIFA vice president Jack Warner, who is among those accused of facilitating bribes—and who bought airtime in his native Trinidad and Tobago just last week to claim he would expose his co-conspirators in a paid advertisement called “The Gloves Are Off.” (Warner, you might remember, is the same guy who recently took an Onion article a bit too seriously.)

In a four-minute segment called “John Oliver: The Mittens of Disapproval Are On,” Oliver called on Warner to follow through on his warning and release all his proof of FIFA’s wrongdoing:

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