Which Congressional Staffer’s License Plate Is This? (Photos)

Mother Jones

Fight disinformation: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter and follow the news that matters.


Just received in the office from a congressional staffer we know:

So this Lincoln Navigator belongs to someone who works in the House of Representatives (it’s parked in the Longworth Building). Even in a place like Texas with ZERO rules, I figure there have to be some kind of guidelines about what you can get on your license plate. Something tells me you shouldn’t be able to get “WHAT THE FUCK, OBAMA?”

Well, we here are big fans of that First Amendment thing, but state motor-vehicle departments do tend to put “decency” limits on how far you can pimp your plate. We’ll be askin’ the Texas DMV about that very thing momentarily. (We’ve been through this before…or, actually, an out-and-out case of license-plate racism, with this Virginia state worker’s Ford F-150.)

As for the congressional driver’s identity, we’ll leave that sort of sleuthing up to the cloud for now. Though, judging from the decal under the brake light (see full pic below), they’re a Texas Tech alum. Or fan. Or, maybe it’s Bobby Knight.

In any case, you’d like to think that a Hill staffer (or member of Congress?) can at least appear politically even-handed in the parking lot. Besides, if you can afford a Lincoln SUV to get you to your government job in the District of Columbia, what exactly are you so pissed at the prez about, anyway?


Photo: Mother Jones

A BETTER WAY TO DO THIS?

We have an ambitious $350,000 online fundraising goal this month and we can't afford to come up short. But when a reader recently asked how being a nonprofit makes Mother Jones different from other news organizations, we realized we needed to lay this out better: Because "in absolutely every way" is essentially the answer.

So we tried to explain why your year-end donations are so essential, and we'd like your help refining our pitch about what make Mother Jones valuable and worth reading to you.

We'd also like your support of our journalism with a year-end donation if you can right now—all online gifts will be doubled until we hit our $350,000 goal thanks to an incredibly generous donor's matching gift pledge.

payment methods

A BETTER WAY TO DO THIS?

We have an ambitious $350,000 online fundraising goal this month and we can't afford to come up short. But when a reader recently asked how being a nonprofit makes Mother Jones different from other news organizations, we realized we needed to lay this out better: Because "in absolutely every way" is essentially the answer.

So we tried to explain why your year-end donations are so essential, and we'd like your help refining our pitch about what make Mother Jones valuable and worth reading to you.

We'd also like your support of our journalism with a year-end donation if you can right now—all online gifts will be doubled until we hit our $350,000 goal thanks to an incredibly generous donor's matching gift pledge.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate