Hot GOP Chicks [Video]

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Hey, remember when the Republicans ran a lady for vice president, and complained about the “sexism!” heaped on her by Democratic women? Remember how the GOP claimed to flood the zone with female candidates, purported to be the real feminists defending womankind against horrible liberalism, and decreed 2010 to be the year of the “mama grizzly“?

Their bad! It was all a ploy to score hot chicks, and to leave the dregs for those boner commies on the left. Ha ha, yeah bro! High-five it! Pass me one of them Bud Light Limes!

Yes, it’s true: Comes information that the Minnesota state GOP*, which insists that you take Rep. Michele Bachmann and this guy seriously, put its true womanly feelings on YouTube. Shorter version: GOP babes are BABES with Tom Jones’ endorsement…and Dem womyn are ugly fat butch dog lesbians, especially when you Photoshop them onto pictures of hairy Arab detainees and other man bodies! Note: That is not me exaggerating with cynical lefty hyperbole. Please, for the love of all that’s holy and sacred, watch this video in its entirety:

The Minnesota Independent caught up with the state GOP’s site’s webmaster, Randy Brown, who not only copped to posting the video, but defended it: “[I]ts only intention was to bring a smile to a few peoples faces, and possibly irritate a few others. Is it fair? Does that matter? It wasn’t intended to be fair. It was intended to be funny.

Yeah, ha ha, ha ha! Rawk, bro! Let’s go watch some b-ball and shoot pigeons with some brews. Hang on, dudebrah, just lemme get my beer koozie!

[*Note: Minnesota GOP communications director Mark Drake called to clarify that the video was on a district GOP site, not the state GOP’s site, and that he’d never heard of the webmaster before. While expressing regret over the video’s content, he said the 56th district was one of more than 100 autonomous Republican parties in the state, and his umbrella organization wasn’t responsible. He then declined to answer follow-up questions regarding what action, if any, had been taken by the state GOP to make the local group accountable for its actions. Mark, if you’re reading this and want to explain what steps the state GOP is taking, give us a call.]

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WHO DOESN’T LOVE A POSITIVE STORY—OR TWO?

“Great journalism really does make a difference in this world: it can even save kids.”

That’s what a civil rights lawyer wrote to Julia Lurie, the day after her major investigation into a psychiatric hospital chain that uses foster children as “cash cows” published, letting her know he was using her findings that same day in a hearing to keep a child out of one of the facilities we investigated.

That’s awesome. As is the fact that Julia, who spent a full year reporting this challenging story, promptly heard from a Senate committee that will use her work in their own investigation of Universal Health Services. There’s no doubt her revelations will continue to have a big impact in the months and years to come.

Like another story about Mother Jones’ real-world impact.

This one, a multiyear investigation, published in 2021, exposed conditions in sugar work camps in the Dominican Republic owned by Central Romana—the conglomerate behind brands like C&H and Domino, whose product ends up in our Hershey bars and other sweets. A year ago, the Biden administration banned sugar imports from Central Romana. And just recently, we learned of a previously undisclosed investigation from the Department of Homeland Security, looking into working conditions at Central Romana. How big of a deal is this?

“This could be the first time a corporation would be held criminally liable for forced labor in their own supply chains,” according to a retired special agent we talked to.

Wow.

And it is only because Mother Jones is funded primarily by donations from readers that we can mount ambitious, yearlong—or more—investigations like these two stories that are making waves.

About that: It’s unfathomably hard in the news business right now, and we came up about $28,000 short during our recent fall fundraising campaign. We simply have to make that up soon to avoid falling further behind than can be made up for, or needing to somehow trim $1 million from our budget, like happened last year.

If you can, please support the reporting you get from Mother Jones—that exists to make a difference, not a profit—with a donation of any amount today. We need more donations than normal to come in from this specific blurb to help close our funding gap before it gets any bigger.

payment methods

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