Glenn Beck Goes for the Gold

GlennBeck.com

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So, how has Glenn Beck taken the news that Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-N.Y.) thinks he and his favorite gold dealer, Goldline, are working “hand in hand to cheat consumers”? Not well, by the looks of it. He’s called Weiner a modern-day Joe McCarthy and invited his fans to send in photos of the congressman with “his nose as a wiener.” And as the Beck trackers at Media Matters have documented, he’s not backing away from hyping gold—anything but. On yesterday’s radio show, he plugged Goldline as “the escape” from the economic doomsday scenario he’s been painting for the past couple of years. Earlier in the week, he dragged out his famous chalkboard for a bit what what can only be described as gold-bledygook:

He may seem like he’s losing it, but Beck is clearly reveling in the moment, which lets him tap into persecution complex and his shock-jock roots. Last night, in a bravura performance, Beck ripped into Weiner and then hit the chalkboard to connect the dots between community banking, Acorn, Van Jones, Bill Clinton, and Obama’s mom. You can get a taste of it on his site—right after watching a Goldline promo. And the fun continues tonight, when Beck appears on the O’Reilly Factor to discuss his feud with Weiner, which apparently is the funniest word Beck has heard since he was 11. On his radio program this morning, Beck said the highlight of the taping was hearing O’Reilly admit, “I like Weiner.” I suppose we should be grateful that Beck’s not coming under fire from Washington Democrat Rep. Norm Dicks.

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FACT:

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