Trouble in Paradise? Freedom’s Watch Prez is Out

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Brad Blakeman, the president of the hawkish, pro-surge advocacy group Freedom’s Watch, has resigned amid infighting among the group’s leadership. “Sources close to the conservative nonprofit say that [Blakeman] drew fire for focusing too much on administrative tasks and neglecting major projects since the group sponsored a $15 million television ad campaign in 2007 to promote the Iraq war surge,” reports National Journal‘s Peter Stone, who wrote a profile of Freedom’s Watch backer, casino mogul, Sheldon Adelson, for Mother Jones‘ January/February issue. “Freedom’s Watch reportedly plans to spend as much as $200 million on pro-Republican TV ads on national security and domestic issues this year.”

Adelson has also provided $2 million to back a TV/ radio campaign by a lobby group, Defense of Democracies, to go after House Democrats who don’t support the White House’s preferred domestic surveillance legislation, Stone reports. The Republican bill would provide retroactive immunity to telecommunications companies being sued for billions of dollars by consumers who charge the companies illegally provided the government access to their private communications data. Defense of Democracies was recently set up as a 501(c)4 group by the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, which has received State Department funding. The ads targeting Democrats prompted Democratic members of the advisory board of the previously ostensibly bipartisan Foundation for the Defense of Democracies to resign en masse earlier this month, charging FDD had basically set up an openly partisan front group.

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WE CAME UP SHORT.

We just wrapped up a shorter-than-normal, urgent-as-ever fundraising drive and we came up about $45,000 short of our $300,000 goal.

That means we're going to have upwards of $350,000, maybe more, to raise in online donations between now and June 30, when our fiscal year ends and we have to get to break-even. And even though there's zero cushion to miss the mark, we won't be all that in your face about our fundraising again until June.

So we urgently need this specific ask, what you're reading right now, to start bringing in more donations than it ever has. The reality, for these next few months and next few years, is that we have to start finding ways to grow our online supporter base in a big way—and we're optimistic we can keep making real headway by being real with you about this.

Because the bottom line: Corporations and powerful people with deep pockets will never sustain the type of journalism Mother Jones exists to do. The only investors who won’t let independent, investigative journalism down are the people who actually care about its future—you.

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