“Everyday Math,” Every Child a Loser

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Who says American education isn’t working? Via Slate, I just learned that our children are being taught something called Everyday Math that is going to make every day of their adult lives quite math illiterate. This is so stupid, it’s hard to believe it’s actually going on right now in class rooms across America. What the f*&^ is our problem? You know things are bad when you have to go to that nutball Michelle Malkin for ammunition (see below) that just adds up all too dismally. From Slate:

The [Everyday Math] authors also firmly believe that children are capable of learning a great deal more than previously expected.”

Especially if they use a calculator. Or take a simple multiplication problem and turn it into a “cluster” of five other, simpler problems. Or make a pretty “lattice” box and input numbers. Apparently, like Barbie once said, “Math is hard!” and we have to dumb it down for everyone rather than figure out ways to let the smartest kids excel and provide help to those who need it. This video that Malkin posts is long but well worth watching. The woman in the video–who went back to school to facilitate a midlife career switch and was startled to see the youngsters in her class struggling–shows how bizarre and convoluted this “new new” math is.

As critics are pointing out, kids are not learning better with these techniques. Children aren’t learning multiplication in third grade, since they are repeating the addition and subtraction they should have learned in first grade. And check out this sample question from a fifth-grade text:

A. If math were a color, it would be –, because –.

God help me, I put on a gas mask and forced myself to Malkin’s site to watch one of the most disturbing videos I’ve ever had to endure. No wonder people home school; EveryDay Math in action must be seen to be believed. I’ve saved you the horror of visiting Malkin’s site, so click the link above (it’s You Tube), then call your child’s school and make sure that Everyday Math is not on your child’s curriculum unless you want to spend your dotage helping them figure out how to cut a recipe in half or balance their checkbooks.

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