More Wikipedia Fun (Waaaaah!)

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So the Times has gotten around to a story on Wikiscanner, the new online tool that allows you to look up Wikipedia edits made from computers at various organizations, companies, etc. (Check out our favorite editing wars here, and our interview with Wikipedia’s Jimmy Wales on politics 2.0 here.) It’s got some choice tidbits—someone at the Gray Lady edited the entry for Condoleezza Rice to change “pianist” to “penis”—but overall, the BBC take a couple of days ago was more amusing (h/t to our own Cameron Scott). There’s the CIA bit Bruce blogged on:

On the profile of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the tool indicates that a worker on the CIA network reportedly added the exclamation “Wahhhhhh!” before a section on the leader’s plans for his presidency.

There’s also this:

The site also indicates that a computer owned by the US Democratic Party was used to make changes to the site of right-wing talk show host Rush Limbaugh.

The changes brand Mr Limbaugh as “idiotic,” a “racist”, and a “bigot”. An entry about his audience now reads: “Most of them are legally retarded.”

[…]”We don’t condone these sorts of activities and we take every precaution to ensure that our network is used in a responsible manner,” Doug Thornell of the DCCC told the BBC News website.

And the list goes on… someone at Diebold removed a reference to the company chairman Walden O’Dell being a top Bush fundraiser… the Vatican edited an entry on Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams… But why let other people have all the fun. Try it yourself. (A “Mother Jones” search, sadly, finds no entries. But why is someone at the Republican Party editing the “Baking” entry to add a citation for “bottom broiler”?

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