Simon says . . . TV should do more.

Facts matter: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter. Support our nonprofit reporting. Subscribe to our print magazine.


The hue and cry over graphic TV violence has Congress turning up the heat on the entertainment industry (“Honey, I warped the kids,” July/August 1993). The broadcast networks say they’ve made substantial headway in the past year in reducing their violent programming; while Senator Paul Simon, D-Illinois, admits to some progress, he still finds the industry’s standards “squooshy” and their parental advisories “not a substitute for changing content.” To ward off congressional regulation, Simon says, the industry should set up its own self-policing monitoring group–and soon. “If the industry simply closes its eyes and buries its head in the sand,” he warns, “they’re asking for government action.” To be continued . . .

THE END...

of our fiscal year is Thursday, June 30, and we have a much larger fundraising gap than we can easily manage with only days left to go.

Right now is no time to come up short: If you value the hard-hitting, democracy-protecting, justice-advancing journalism you get from Mother Jones, please help us keep charging as hard as we possibly can with a much-needed and much-appreciated donation today.

payment methods

THE END...

of our fiscal year is Thursday, June 30, and we have a much larger fundraising gap than we can easily manage with only days left to go.

Right now is no time to come up short: If you value the hard-hitting, democracy-protecting, justice-advancing journalism you get from Mother Jones, please help us keep charging as hard as we possibly can with a much-needed and much-appreciated donation today.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate