Donald Trump’s Press Secretary Sends Even Crazier Tweets Than Donald Trump

Meet “alternative facts” Sean Spicer. He hates Dippin’ Dots and regularly swallows cinammon-flavored gum.


Over the weekend, the American people were introduced to President Donald Trump’s new press secretary, Sean Spicer, who dedicated his first press conference on Saturday to angrily accuse members of the media of purposely misleading the public about the size of Friday’s inauguration crowd.

According to Spicer, Trump drew the “largest audience ever to witness an inauguration, period,” a patently false claim that Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway later defended as “alternative facts.” Both statements added a fresh new layer of humiliation to Trump’s first few days in office.

While the country has been well acquainted with Conway’s expert spin skills by now, most Americans are still wondering who just delivered one of the strangest White House pressers in recent memory. For the uninitiated, here’s what a brief look at Spicer’s social-media utterances reveal:

He has engaged in a yearslong war with Dippin’ Dots:

Like his boss, he makes a habit of airing consumer grievances on Twitter:

He hates Daft Punk:

Also making the rounds since Saturday’s press conference is a Washington Post piece from August that revealed the gross fact that Spicer regularly chews and swallows 35 pieces of Orbit cinnamon-flavored gum—all before noon.

It’s a lot to take in. But take comfort in knowing we all still have four long years to get acquainted.

FACT:

Mother Jones was founded as a nonprofit in 1976 because we knew corporations and the wealthy wouldn't fund the type of hard-hitting journalism we set out to do.

Today, reader support makes up about two-thirds of our budget, allows us to dig deep on stories that matter, and lets us keep our reporting free for everyone. If you value what you get from Mother Jones, please join us with a tax-deductible donation today so we can keep on doing the type of journalism 2020 demands.

payment methods

FACT:

Mother Jones was founded as a nonprofit in 1976 because we knew corporations and the wealthy wouldn't fund the type of hard-hitting journalism we set out to do.

Today, reader support makes up about two-thirds of our budget, allows us to dig deep on stories that matter, and lets us keep our reporting free for everyone. If you value what you get from Mother Jones, please join us with a tax-deductible donation today so we can keep on doing the type of journalism 2020 demands.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate