Photoshop Use Is Now Regulated in France

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This is interesting:

In France last week, a bill was signed into law requiring that models show their employers a doctor’s note certifying they’re of a healthy weight….The statute also demands that magazines explicitly indicate any photographs that have been altered with an editing program, like Photoshop.

….Studies have shown that, out of all Western Europeans, French women have the lowest BMI, at 23.2. With 11 percent of French women considered “extremely thin,” the government has spent the better part of 2015 trying to curb its anorexia epidemic. In March, the country passed legislation criminalizing “pro-anorexia” and “thinspiration” websites, promising to slap perpetrators with a €10,000 fine ($10,800) and one year in prison.

France isn’t the first country to impose such a law. In 2012, Israel banished too-thin models from starring in advertisement photos. Similar measures were undertaken in Spain and Italy in 2006, where underweight models are now prohibited from walking the catwalk in fashion shows.

I knew about the new law in France that requires a doctor’s note for models, but I had no idea about the rest of this stuff. The Photoshop thing is certainly intriguing. I wonder if French fashion magazines will start putting notices on every photo, or if they can get away with a single big warning in the Table of Contents?

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FACT:

Mother Jones was founded as a nonprofit in 1976 because we knew corporations and the wealthy wouldn't fund the type of hard-hitting journalism we set out to do.

Today, reader support makes up about two-thirds of our budget, allows us to dig deep on stories that matter, and lets us keep our reporting free for everyone. If you value what you get from Mother Jones, please join us with a tax-deductible donation today so we can keep on doing the type of journalism 2020 demands.

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