IBM Unveils Chip That’s Maybe As Powerful As a Cockroach

For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.


IBM has announced a new chip that it says is a breakthrough in emulating the human brain:

“Power is the fundamental constraint as we move forward,” says Horst Simon, deputy director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a major supercomputer user. “This chip is an indication that we are really at the threshold of a fundamental change in architecture.”

….TrueNorth, IBM says, uses 5.4 billion transistors—four times more than a typical PC processor—to yield the equivalent of one million neurons and 256 million synapses. They are organized into 4,096 structures called “neurosynaptic cores,” each able to store, process and transmit data to any other using a communications scheme called a crossbar.

The design is “event-driven,” Mr. Modha says. That means that individual cores fire up only when they are needed, rather than running all the time. This scheme makes the chips more power efficient. Where a comparable standard microprocessor draws 50 to 100 watts per square centimeter, TrueNorth draws just 20 milliwatts, or thousandths of a watt, IBM says.

That’s about as many neurons as a small insect has. You’d need something on the order of 100,000 of these chips to provide as many neurons as the typical human brain—though that’s probably not really a meaningful number. If digital neurons are faster than chemical neurons, you might need fewer of them. You also don’t need any of the neurons that are designed solely to keep the body physically alive. And traditional chips can pick up a lot of the load too. On the other hand, the 3-D structure of the brain provides some advantages you don’t get from a 2-D chip.

In other words, who knows? Maybe you need 10,000, maybe you need a million. Maybe this whole approach will turn out to be a dead end. And we’re still a long way off from developing the software to make this all work in any case.

Still: it’s cool stuff. There are lots of different approaches to developing artificial intelligence, and this is certainly a plausible one. It probably won’t take too long before we know whether it really holds the promise that AI researchers hope it does.

FACT:

Mother Jones was founded as a nonprofit in 1976 because we knew corporations and the wealthy wouldn't fund the type of hard-hitting journalism we set out to do.

Today, reader support makes up about two-thirds of our budget, allows us to dig deep on stories that matter, and lets us keep our reporting free for everyone. If you value what you get from Mother Jones, please join us with a tax-deductible donation today so we can keep on doing the type of journalism 2020 demands.

FACT:

Mother Jones was founded as a nonprofit in 1976 because we knew corporations and the wealthy wouldn't fund the type of hard-hitting journalism we set out to do.

Today, reader support makes up about two-thirds of our budget, allows us to dig deep on stories that matter, and lets us keep our reporting free for everyone. If you value what you get from Mother Jones, please join us with a tax-deductible donation today so we can keep on doing the type of journalism 2020 demands.

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate