Word of the Day: Brinkmanship


Yesterday my copy editor objected to my use of the word brinksmanship, recommending that I replace it with brinkmanship. I prefer the version with the S, but I usually take his advice unless I have a pretty good reason not to. Since my dictionary lists both variants as acceptable, I did what I usually do next: I powered up the Google Ngram Viewer to see which version is in more common use. Here’s the result:

The version without an S is plainly the most common by a wide margin, so I went ahead and made the change. But I was intrigued that the word apparently first appears in 1955 and then shoots up the charts quickly, suggesting that it’s a child of the nuclear age. Sure enough, dictionary.com confirms that this is when it first appeared, coined by Adlai Stevenson during the 1956 presidential campaign:

Associated with the policies advocated by John Foster Dulles (1888-1959), U.S. Secretary of State 1953-1959. The word springs from Dulles’ philosophy as outlined in a magazine interview with Time-Life Washington bureau chief James Shepley early 1956:

“The ability to get to the verge without getting into the war is the necessary art. If you cannot master it, you inevitably get into war. If you try to run away from it, if you are scared to go to the brink, you are lost.”

The quote was widely criticized by the Eisenhower Administration’s opponents, and the first attested use of brinkmanship seems to have been in such a context, a few weeks after the magazine appeared, by Democratic presidential candidate Adlai Stevenson criticizing Dulles for “boasting of his brinkmanship, … the art of bringing us to the edge of the nuclear abyss.”

This is news to me, and since we’ve been playing budget brinkmanship for the past few months, I thought a brief refresher on the nuclear origins of the word might be in order.

Also (according to dictionary.com once again), the S in the alternate spelling is a “parasitic S.” What the heck is that? Can any linguists help out here?

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Reclaiming power from those who abuse it often starts with telling the truth. And in "This Is How Authoritarians Get Defeated," MoJo's Monika Bauerlein unpacks six truths to remember during the homestretch of an election where democracy, truth, and decency are on the line.

Truth #1: The chaos is the point.

Truth #2: Team Reality is bigger than it seems.

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SIX TRUTHS

Reclaiming power from those who abuse it often starts with telling the truth. And in "This Is How Authoritarians Get Defeated," MoJo's Monika Bauerlein unpacks six truths to remember during the homestretch of an election where democracy, truth, and decency are on the line.

Truth #1: The chaos is the point.

Truth #2: Team Reality is bigger than it seems.

Truth #3: Facebook owns this.

Truth #4: When we go to work, we're in the fight.

Truth #5: It's about minority rule.

Truth #6: The only thing that can save us is…us.

Please take a moment to see how all these truths add up, because what happens in the weeks and months ahead will reverberate for at least a generation and we better be prepared.

And if you think journalism like Mother Jones'—that calls it like it is, that will never acquiesce to power, that looks where others don't—can help guide us through this historic, high-stakes moment, and you're able to right now, please help us reach our $350,000 goal by October 31 with a donation today. It's all hands on deck for democracy.

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