Gridlock Might Destroy the US Economy, But It’s Still Good for Business

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Robert Costa writes today that both Republican aides and veteran House members are worried that it’s fast becoming impossible to find a budget compromise that can win the support of the Republican caucus:

Both camps fear that a shutdown is increasingly likely — and they blame the conservative movement’s cottage industry of pressure groups.

But these organizations, ensconced in Northern Virginia office parks and elsewhere, aren’t worried about the establishment’s ire. In fact, they welcome it. Business has boomed since the push to defund Obamacare caught on. Conservative activists are lighting up social media, donations are pouring in, and e-mail lists are growing.

There you have it. Gridlock is good for business. Nuff said.

It’s all pretty remarkable, isn’t it? Our government is deadlocked because Republicans control one half of one branch of the government. The tea party faction controls that half because it can prevent John Boehner from being re-elected Speaker if he crosses them. So we’ve somehow maneuvered ourselves into a place where 40 or 50 fanatic representatives can bring the entire government of the most powerful nation on Earth to a screeching halt. And somehow this seems….kind of normal. It hardly even raises an eyebrow anymore.

Just thought I’d mention that.

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