Fight disinformation: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter and follow the news that matters.


Jonathan Bernstein on whether Republicans are really going to base this fall’s campaign on repeal of healthcare reform:

Will they explicitly call for repeal? My guess is [they] will feel heavy pressure (self-inflicted or otherwise) to follow whatever Rush & Co. say, and there’s certainly competition among the talk show hosts to be the most rejectionist at all. And in a campaign context, it’s even easier to call for repeal, followed by passing simple common sense steps to eliminate pre-existing conditions, etc. than it was in a legislative context; there’s no threat of them having to submit an actual proposal, or having it scored by CBO. Certainly, Republican activists and primary voters believe that the new law is incredibly unpopular (and will probably continue to believe that regardless of polling), and so they will not believe that a “repeal” position is dangerous in a general election. So, all in all, I do think the odds are good that many GOP candidates will run on repeal in 2010, and probably in the 2012 presidential nomination process as well.

I pretty much agree. Not only are Republicans genuinely opposed to the bill, but Jonathan is right about the effect of Fox and talk radio egging them on. And I wouldn’t be surprised if that produces a backlash. It’s one thing to campaign against the bill — it might even be a winning strategy among right and center-right voters — but the Drudge/Fox/Rush axis is going to force conservative candidates into ever shriller and more baroque denunciations (see, for example, Mitt Romney claiming that “President Obama has betrayed his oath to the nation”), and that might not wear so well even out in the fabled heartland. That’s especially true when it turns out that the fabric of the nation doesn’t collapse the way it was supposed to on the day after the bill was signed.

Generally speaking, the D/F/R axis isn’t that visible outside its direct audience. That’s a good thing for Republicans since the stuff they spout really doesn’t go over well with anyone outside the true believer base. But if Republican candidates feel like they have to toe the axis line, suddenly it’s going to be a lot more visible — and it might turn off a lot of people. We’ll see.

A BETTER WAY TO DO THIS?

We have an ambitious $350,000 online fundraising goal this month and we can't afford to come up short. But when a reader recently asked how being a nonprofit makes Mother Jones different from other news organizations, we realized we needed to lay this out better: Because "in absolutely every way" is essentially the answer.

So we tried to explain why your year-end donations are so essential, and we'd like your help refining our pitch about what make Mother Jones valuable and worth reading to you.

We'd also like your support of our journalism with a year-end donation if you can right now—all online gifts will be doubled until we hit our $350,000 goal thanks to an incredibly generous donor's matching gift pledge.

payment methods

A BETTER WAY TO DO THIS?

We have an ambitious $350,000 online fundraising goal this month and we can't afford to come up short. But when a reader recently asked how being a nonprofit makes Mother Jones different from other news organizations, we realized we needed to lay this out better: Because "in absolutely every way" is essentially the answer.

So we tried to explain why your year-end donations are so essential, and we'd like your help refining our pitch about what make Mother Jones valuable and worth reading to you.

We'd also like your support of our journalism with a year-end donation if you can right now—all online gifts will be doubled until we hit our $350,000 goal thanks to an incredibly generous donor's matching gift pledge.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate