Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.

Felix Salmon thinks the rest of the world is shirking:

Justin Fox has an interesting breakdown of global stimulus packages by country: the US, China, and Spain have big ones, while the rest of the world just doesn’t seem to be trying so hard….He’s right, and no amount of “buy American” provisions in the bill will prevent money from leaking overseas in a globalized economy. Liquidity, you might say, always finds its level. At the margin, it does seem that countries such as the UK are freeloading on the US bailout — both in terms of the stimulus package and in terms of the bank bailout.

I don’t know about Spain, but the U.S. was able to pass a big stimulus bill because we had a shiny new left-wing president with lots of political capital to spend, and China was able to do it because they’re an autocracy. Conversely, most European governments range from the not-very-shiny (Germany, say) to the downright superannuated (Britain).  They don’t have a yearlong campaign of hope and change to draw from.  What’s more, as Matt Yglesias and Megan McArdle point out, there are also institutional and cultural issues holding Europe back.  The Germans are still scared of a resurgence of the Weimar Republic, and the European Central Bank humors them by keeping monetary policy absurdly tight.  The EU’s stability and growth pact probably doesn’t help things either.  The upshot is that Europe isn’t doing much to fight the meltdown, and that’s especially true of Germany, which ought to be leading the charge since it runs a big current account surplus and could afford to spend much, much more.  Instead, it’s one of the chief obstacles to recovery.

I don’t have any brilliant suggestions for getting Europe to become a little more proactive on the let’s-avoid-another-great-depression front.  Just one more job for the Obama economic team to work on, I suppose.  Maybe someday Treasury will actually hire someone besides Tim Geithner and we can start pushing on this a little harder than we are now.

ONE MORE QUICK THING:

Or at least we hope. It’s fall fundraising time, and we’re trying to raise $250,000 to help fund Mother Jones’ journalism during a shorter than normal three-week push.

If you’re reading this, a fundraising pitch at the bottom of an article, you must find our team’s reporting valuable and we hope you’ll consider supporting it with a donation of any amount right now if you can.

It’s really that simple. But if you’d like to read a bit more, our membership lead, Brian Hiatt, has a post for you highlighting some of our newsroom's impressive, impactful work of late—including two big investigations in just one day and covering voting rights the way it needs to be done—that we hope you'll agree is worth supporting.

payment methods

ONE MORE QUICK THING:

Or at least we hope. It’s fall fundraising time, and we’re trying to raise $250,000 to help fund Mother Jones’ journalism during a shorter than normal three-week push.

If you’re reading this, a fundraising pitch at the bottom of an article, you must find our team’s reporting valuable and we hope you’ll consider supporting it with a donation of any amount right now if you can.

It’s really that simple. But if you’d like to read a bit more, our membership lead, Brian Hiatt, has a post for you highlighting some of our newsroom's impressive, impactful work of late—including two big investigations in just one day and covering voting rights the way it needs to be done—that we hope you’ll agree is worth supporting.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate