Warren Nailed Bloomberg for Allegedly Telling a Pregnant Employee to “Kill It”

While delivering a powerful personal story about being discriminated against during her pregnancy, Senator Elizabeth Warren launched a direct attack against former New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg over allegations he told an employee to “kill it,” when the employee told him she was pregnant.

“This is personal for me,” said Warren, who described being let go at the age of 21 from her job as a special education teacher after she became pregnant. Adding “at least I didn’t have a boss who said to me, ‘Kill it,’ the way that Mayor Bloomberg is alleged to have said to one of his pregnant employees.” 

Bloomberg has denied these allegations. However, the comment did appear in a 1997 sexual harassment lawsuit against Bloomberg, which he later settled. 

According the lawsuit, after suggesting his employee should get an abortion, Bloomberg said, “Great, number 16,” apparently a reference to the number of women who were pregnant at the company. 

Bloomberg has faced dozens of lawsuits throughout the years from women alleging discrimination and harassment at his company, who claim he created a hostile and degrading work environment. 

Warren has also attacked Bloomberg for his use of non-disclosure agreements, which she called an attempt to “muzzle” women who wanted to speak out against him.

Bloomberg has since publicly released released three women from non-disclosure agreements specifically related to comments made by the former mayor.

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